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DeLand Estate Planning Blog

What if your heir struggles with a drug problem?

There are some cases in which people would like to leave their assets to a specific heir, but they worry that the heir may have habits or behaviors that will be detrimental to their future.  For example, perhaps you have three children, and two of them are financially...

What are the benefits of a trust?

In your estate plan, you may designate heirs to inherit your assets. This may mean giving your spouse the house and savings, your children your car and heirlooms and maybe even a friend or distant relative something special. However, using a will to allocate assets to...

Blended families and estate planning

Estate planning can be complicated enough when you’re just dealing with one family. But when you have a blended family, essentially mixing two families together after a second marriage, it gets to be very complex. It also increases the odds that your heirs will...

The basic elements of any estate plan

Passing away without an estate plan means you relinquish quite a bit of control over your assets and affairs. If you become incapacitated before your death without certain documents and plans established, someone else will make all your medical decisions, and it may...

Why your will needs to stay up to date

A will is an estate planning document that provides instructions on how your assets should be divided upon your death. It can also make clear who you intend to look after your minor children in the event that something happens to you.  Per Florida Statutes Chapter 732...

3 benefits of creating a thorough estate plan

Estate planning is a process that many people would prefer to delay or entirely avoid. However, this approach is both selfish, as it passes a lot of stress on to other people, and very risky. When you don't have a comprehensive estate plan in place, things could go...

How do I choose a witness for my will?

You can decide what will happen to your estate by creating a will. However, for your will to be valid, it must be created in accordance with Florida laws. This means that you have to be at least 18 years old and have the testamentary capacity to create a will. It also...

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